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Looking for a Barrier Filter to Cover the Sun

Posted By Alan Frohlichstein, Friday, August 23, 2013
Updated: Friday, August 23, 2013

Each St. Patrick’s Day in Chicago, we have the dying of the Chicago River. A short section of the river, between Wabash and the lock to Lake Michigan, has Fluorescein Sodium dumped in from a motorboat, which then proceeds to stir it up, giving the river an intense green color. I have made several attempts over the years to image this process as an angiogram, with an exciter and barrier filter, but, so far, I have been only marginally successful. The Barrier filter works well, but I haven’t found an exciter filter to fit over the sun, or at least a half mile by three quarter mile area over the river. I have made a few attempts at night, but between the ambient light, and the diffusion of the fluorescein in the intervening hours, nothing really imaged.


The images in this group are from 2012.

 

Pre Injection

Pre Injection

 

Arterial Filling

Arterial Filling

 

Venous Phase

Venous Phase

 

Recirculation

Recirculatin

 

More Recirculation

More Recirculation

 

Late Phase

Late Phase

 

With Barrier Filter

With Barrier Filter

 

Without Barrier Filter

Without Barrier Filter

 

The Wrigley Building

The Wrigley Building

 

If you know where I can get the super size exciter filter, please let me know.

 

Alan Frohlichstein, BFA, BS, CRA, FOPS

Tags:  blog  Chicago  Chicago River  cute  Fluorescein Sodium Dye  funny  Ice Breakers  Interactive  Meaningful Use  PDC  Tips  Travel 

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Permalink | Comments (7)
 

Comments on this post...

...
Timothy J. Bennett CRA OCT-C says...
Posted Friday, August 23, 2013
Awesome Alan! Visiting Chjicago on St. Patty's Day is on my bucket list. - one of these days...

Hey this would be a perfect fit for "Pearls, Tips, & Tactics" at the annual meeting!
Permalink to this Comment }

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Taylor Pannell CRA OCT-C says...
Posted Monday, August 26, 2013
This is pretty cool!
Permalink to this Comment }

...
Jim Stoutenburg says...
Posted Saturday, August 31, 2013
Alan, doing a quick search, you can get an exciter filter (1/2 mile X 3/4 mile) assuming you what research grade specs, for about
93 million dollars(US). It's considered a custom order so you might want to do this soon , to have your results ready for the 2014 annual meeting.........
Permalink to this Comment }

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Paula F. Morris CRA FOPS says...
Posted Thursday, September 5, 2013
Alan,

This is hilarious - so clever! I tell my patients about the "geening 'o the river" scene from The Fugitive movie, but now I think I'll use some of your great images. LOVE the angiogram phases! I want to be there for Tim's bucket list St. Patty's Day - we could make it an educational expereince that might? be worth 1 hr of OPS CECs? Or not....
Permalink to this Comment }

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Darrin A. Landry CRA OCT-C says...
Posted Tuesday, September 17, 2013
Alan
before you go spending millions on an exciter filter, you may want to check the properties of the dye. My understanding was that several years ago the EPA was successful in the discontinuation of the use of fluorescein and the parade committee switched to a "vegetable dye", which probably contain no excitable molecules.
Permalink to this Comment }

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Timothy J. Bennett CRA OCT-C says...
Posted Tuesday, September 17, 2013
Yeah, allegedly the actual dye used to stain the Chicago River is a "secret". It starts out as orange powder but when added to the water it "magically" turns green (sounds like fluorescein).They supposedly switched to an environmentally friendly dye (from oil-based to vegetable) years ago to appease public concerns in 1966, but I'd say its a form of fluorescein until proven otherwise. The most common commercial fluorescent green tracer dyes are often listed as "biodegradeable", "non-toxic" and can be used to test drinking water systems. Last time I looked at the specs & MSDS on them, the commercial fluorescent green dyes were listed as xanthene or fluorescein. Fluorescein disodium is in the xanthene family. It's likely they fine-tuned the dose so it lasts just a few hours before it degrades in sunlight.

It would be fun to use a small exciter & barrier filter setup & photograph a water sample from the river.... Alan, do you think you can get down to water level to get a sample?

Whatever it is, its pretty cool.
Permalink to this Comment }

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Eric N. Kegley CRA FOPS COA says...
Posted Thursday, September 26, 2013
Cool pics. I had a patient that was a petrochemical engineer and they use fluorescein to trace water flow dynamics. He/she (HIPPA) was amused that I was going to inject him/her with the same stuff he/she used on a daily basis.
Permalink to this Comment }

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