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NEW Course Spotlight: Getting the Most Out of Your OCT

Posted By Elaine Lok, Monday, October 13, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, September 2, 2014

NEW Course Spotlight:  Getting the Most Out of Your OCT

Date:  Monday, October 20, 2014 @ 8:30 AM

Speaker:  Tim Steffens, CRA 

This course will give you the practical tools to identify how to get those good OCT images even better on everyday patients and those difficult ones. A variety of speakers will discuss instrument specific techniques for the Spectralis, Cirrus and OptoVue.

At the end of this course students will be able to identify the proper procedures for imaging patients, techniques for optimizing image quality and what features or functions are best to use on their specific instrument.


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City Spotlight: Chicago Jazz Scene

Posted By Elaine Lok CRA, Saturday, October 11, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, October 7, 2014

With the OPS annual meeting in Chicago this year, this is a great opportunity to hear world class Jazz and Blues in many of the Chicago clubs.  Long a center for Jazz and Blues, Chicago boast a long history of support for these  musical art forms. The Chicago Blues festival began in 1984, and  is held annually in June, celebrating its 31st year  the festival is free to attend.


The Chicago Jazz Festival now in its 36th year began as a memorial concert for Duke Ellington in 1974.  
Later, another concert in honor of John Coltrane was also held, and in 1979 the Jazz Institute of Chicago. 

 

With the City of Chicago combined the various concerts into what became the Chicago Jazz Festival. The Festival is held over Labor Day Weekend. The venue was recently moved to  the Pritzker Pavilion in Millennium Park after years at the Petrillo Band shell  in nearby Grant Park.


While these great events have already occurred, many of the performers can be heard in the Clubs and small theaters around Chicago. For information on Jazz and Blues clubs see the links below.

http://www.chicagobluesguide.com/guide/blues-clubs/blues-clubs-page.html

http://chicagoist.com/2013/09/11/the_best_jazz_clubs_and_showcases_i.php


For current information on what to do and see, check the Choose Chicago web site, trip advisor and Time out Chicago.

http://www.choosechicago.com

http://www.tripadvisor.com/Attractions-g35805-Activities-Chicago_Illinois.html

http://www.timeout.com/chicago

To get specific information by area or topic with reviews use the search function at the top of Yelp.com or http://www.yelp.com/search?find_desc=Live+Jazz+Clubs&find_loc=Chicago%2C+IL 

 

And remember, the OPS was founded at the Palmer House in Chicago 45 years ago, so while we haven’t been around as long as Chicago Blues and Jazz, we have been around longer than the festivals. 


Whatever you choose to do while in Chicago, have fun!


 

 

 

 

  

 

  Dave Holland and Kevin Eubanks

 

 Terrance Blanchard Chicago Jazz Festival 2014

  Esperansa Spalding Chicago Jazz Festival 2014 

 

 

Text and Photos by Alan Frohlichstein CRA, FOPS

 

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NEW Course Spotlight: Rescuing the Retina

Posted By Elaine Lok, Friday, October 10, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, September 2, 2014


NEW Course Spotlight: Rescuing the Retina

Date:  Monday, October 20, 2014 @10:15 AM

Speaker:  Tamer Mahmoud, MD,PhD 


What an extraordinary time we live in where both surgical and non-surgical approaches to “rescue the retina” have and continue to be developed. We are still right on the cusp of discovery with new and improved drugs, drug delivery systems, and surgical techniques that are resulting in better and better visual outcomes for our patients. Advances in imaging technology and creative imaging techniques allow for more accurate definition of disease state, both prior to, during, and following intervention. The Ophthalmic Photographer plays a vital role in the documentation and follow-up of vitreoretinal interface, retinal, and choroidal disorders.

Upon completion of this course, the attendee will have an understanding of the surgical and non-surgical interventions that the contemporary retinal surgeon employs and what imaging technology and techniques have become indispensable in the care of today’s retina patients.


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NEW Course Spotlight: Double-Header: Game 1: Super Heroes of Vision, & Game 2: Ten Coolest Eyes on the Planet

Posted By Elaine Lok, Wednesday, October 8, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, September 2, 2014

NEW Course Spotlight: Double-Header: Game 1: Super Heroes of Vision, &  Game 2: Ten Coolest Eyes on the Planet

Date:  Sunday, October 19, 2014 @ 2:45PM

Speaker:  Ivan Schwab, MD 

Studying the animal eye has helped us develop new advances in the field of Ophthalmology.

Photographers are sometimes called upon to image mice, rabbits, and other creatures, but none so unusual as these:

Game 1: Super Heroes of Vision: Evolution has provided

at least 10 different optical designs including the compound, camera style and simple eye with mirror, scanning or telephoto optics. Some of these ocular designs are merely curiosities, but others offer the finest visual potential packed into a small space limited only by the laws of diffraction or physiological optics. We will review the top five of these including an animal that can withstand 1000x gravity, an animal that can see through stone, an animal that can see without sunlight, an animal that is a successful predator 95% of the time, and an animal that has the best vision on the planet. We should be so lucky.

Game 2: Ten Coolest Eyes on the Planet: Sensory organs evolve in lockstep with their owners to help them fit the niche these animals occupy. Some of the niches are difficult or unique and the corresponding eyes are so unusual as to be unbelievable. Each animal that occupies a niche different from our own has an eye with different optics and ocular physiology than we have. Some of these eyes are beyond our imagination and some of these eyes are the very best evolution has to offer. We will review the top ten.

At the conclusion of this presentation the student will be able to discuss how several different optical designs relate to eyes in animals. They will also be able to elaborate on how evolution has adapted these designs for vision to each animal’s advantage in sometimes strange circumstances. Understanding animal vision and varying optical design provides the attendee with an appreciation of and a contrast to their knowledge of the human eye and its own limitations.

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NEW Course Spotlight: Tips and Tricks on Ophthalmic Inflammatory Disease

Posted By Elaine Lok, Monday, October 6, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, September 2, 2014

NEW Course Spotlight:  Tips and Tricks on Ophthalmic Inflammatory Disease

Date:  Tuesday, October 21, 2014 @ 9:45 AM

Speaker:  Mark Greenwald

This course is designed for intermediate to advanced photographers and technicians and will discuss the correlation between systemic inflammatory disease and ophthalmic related conditions. These patients are the most difficult to prepare for and this course will review patient presentation and how to recognize the variables as it relates to proper documentation from a technical and photographic standpoint. Case presentations will accompany signs, symptoms and stages of disease specific inflammatory diseases including anterior and posterior pathology.

At the end of this course attendees will be able to ask the right questions when difficult patients present as a proper patient history is critical in the work up. The attendee will understand how to correctly photograph the disease and be able to identify what is active and inactive in the disease. Proper diagnostic instrumentation will also be thoroughly discussed including external photography, slit lamp photography, fundus photography, montages, and fluorescein angiography, and ICG angiography.

 

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NEW Course Spotlight: Battle of the Blues: Retina Cases From My Time at Duke and UNC

Posted By Elaine Lok, Thursday, October 2, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, September 2, 2014

NEW Course Spotlight:  Battle of the Blues: Retina Cases From My Time at  Duke and UNC

Date:  Monday, October 20, 2014 @ 8:30AM

Speaker:  Sai Chavala, MD

The rivalry between Duke and University of North Carolina is legendary; Basketball, Football, and yes, even Ophthalmology! Both Universities have outstanding ophthalmology departments, residency and fellowship programs and especially outstanding Eye Imaging Departments. Only a very few have been fortunate enough to "play" for BOTH teams.

This course will be an opportunity to showcase some of the interesting retina cases that I have cared for during my time at both Universities, and to highlight the imaging techniques which assist todays retina specialists in diagnosis, treatment decision-making, and follow-up care. At the completion of this course, the attendees will have a better understanding of the imaging devices used in a high-volume, contemporary retina practice.


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NEW Course Spotlight: Women in Ophthalmic Imaging – a Current Perspective

Posted By Elaine Lok, Tuesday, September 30, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, September 2, 2014

NEW Course Spotlight: Women in Ophthalmic Imaging – a Current  Perspective

Date:  Sunday, October 19, 2014 @ 2:45PM

Speaker:  Paula Morris, CRA, FOPS


Our noble profession has been around for over a half century and has evolved in many ways including developing technology, changing roles in patient care and diversifying the workforce. The number of women in ophthalmic imaging has increased dramatically and reflects the gains in women’s employment overall.

This course will present an overview of the role of women in our profession, providing a short historical review of women’s contributions to our Society, and taking a closer look at the current attitudes and actions of women who

are making ophthalmic imaging a career and vocation, not just a job. Discussion of successful work, training, and certification strategies will include active audience participation. Upon registration and prior to the course, each attendee will be asked to participate in a short online survey designed specifically for this presentation. The results of the survey will be reviewed and discussed during the course. At the end of this course, attendees will be able to list and discuss the merits of three strategies for professional development, and describe three skills that are important in successfully supporting and performing current modalities of ophthalmic imaging.


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City Spotlight: Eat & Drink Like a Local – Chicago Bound

Posted By Elaine Lok, Monday, September 29, 2014
Updated: Thursday, September 25, 2014

City Spotlight: Eat & Drink Like a Local – Chicago Bound By Amanda Bye 

The AAO and OPS yearly meeting is right around the corner. Excitement and anticipation builds for yet another great educational meeting in one of the most beautiful cities by a lake, Chicago. As we all begin to register for courses, prepare PowerPoint lectures, and organize travel plans, I encourage everyone to a take moment and think with your stomach - day dream a little about the culinary delights Chicago has to offer. Did the ideas of deep dish pizza, Chicago Style Hot Dogs, five star steakhouses, and authentic Italian restaurants cross your mind? For those who have never been to Chicago, these are all delightful, tasty, and well marketed icons of the Chicago restaurant scene.

However, since this is not the first OPS annual meeting to be held in Chicago, I want to expose you to the culinary underbelly that boasts some of the greatest tastes the city has to offer. This year I encourage you to eat and drink like a local. 

A whole dissertation could be written about the variety of restaurants and bars in the Chicagoland area. I will narrow it down to three things I like to do when I entertain out-of-town visitors: brunch, beer, and dinner. 

Let’s begin with a Chicago staple, brunch. Not quite breakfast and not quite lunch; brunch offers a budget-friendly dining option in any city and more importantly, breakfast options past ten o’clock in the morning. Located on Michigan Avenue, just up the street from McCormick Place convention center, is Yolk: a tasty delight that specializes in - you guessed it - eggs. Sunny side up, scrambled, or drenched in hollandaise, this is a great way to start the day. Two blocks west of Yolk is Eleven City Diner. A Jewish-style diner, known for its delicatessen, with Bubbi inspired recipes including challah French toast (not for the faint of heart), hearty omelets, and a good selection of brunch cocktails. If breakfast is not what you crave, I highly recommend the matzo ball soup and the corned beef sandwich. Prepare to leave stuffed and with a smile on your face.

Heading over to the West Loop of the downtown area is the sister restaurant to Girl and the Goat, The Little Goat Diner. This place serves breakfast all day long and for a good reason. From oatmeal to eggs, pancakes and pastries, this diner takes breakfast to the next level and uses ingredients from neighboring farms. I recommend starting with the jumbo cinnamon roll to share 
and, no matter what you eat, be sure to get a side of bacon and a Bloody Mary (homemade spicy tomato juice and garnished with a goat cheese stuffed olive). The Little Goat Diner is also open late, has a great dinner menu and a creative selection of cocktails.

Moving on to my second favorite meal of the day, beer. After a long day of conferences, it’s nice to meet up with friends, relax, and discuss the day’s activities over a tasty brew. Luckily, Chicago has more than a few spots that meet this criteria. Goose Island, Revolution, Haymarket, and Half Acre are great beer drinking destinations in the city. Goose Island Beer Co. is the most well-known brewery in Chicago with a quality beer selection ranging from the classic 312 beers to the Bourbon County brewed ales. 

Revolution Brewery has a great selection of beers, from the Double Fist double pale ale to my favorite the Rosa Hibiscus Ale. On a personal note, the floral notes on this beer make it a perfect choice for making beer can chicken. Throw a couple cloves of garlic in the can and enjoy the results!

Next on the tour is the Haymarket Brewery, in the West Loop (fyi, the West Loop has great restaurants), and is a great place to drink and feast on pub fare. Half Acre Beer Company is another personal favorite. The Daisy Cutter Pale Ale is a must try. All drinking and no solid food makes for a very short evening out on the town; therefore we must continue on to the dinner portion.

Dinner in Chicago is second to none. Here are a few of my top recommendations for dinner. Continuing on the beer theme, The Duke of Perth is a true Scottish pub located in the Lakeview neighborhood of Chicago. It has Belhaven beer on tap and is best known for the wide variety of whiskey and fish-and-chips (all you can eat on Friday evenings). This is a great local hangout. The Farmhouse is a farm-to-table restaurant featuring seasonal entrées, vegetables, and craft beers. All main courses are delicious and expertly prepared; if the Amish chicken is available, do not pass on that option. Indulge yourself with the beer battered Wisconsin cheese curds or the in-house jerky and roasted nuts.

Davanti Enoteca is my top choice for Italian food in the River North section of Chicago. Rustic Italian cuisine in shareable small plate format. The ricotta and honeycomb, pan seared octopus, and the sea urchin and crab linguine are not to be overlooked. For something with spicier edge, I love the Costa Rican flavors of restaurant Irazu, and the Cuban deliciousness of 90 Miles Cuban Café.

Jaipur, located in the West Loop (see the trend?) is an Indian restaurant serving the classic entrées of mutter paneer, lamb vindaloo, and some of the best nan. It’s second to “nan”! Ethiopian Diamond is a true gem. If it is your first time in an Ethiopian restaurant, definitely try the sambusas and a tour or taste of Ethiopia. The combination plates of vegetables and meats cooked with cinnamon, cloves, turmeric, and ginger is a happy dance for the taste buds. They are also known for their housemade honey wine and selection of African beers.

Lastly, because Chicago is a pizza town and I cringe when tourists say how much they love some of the bigger franchises, I will give two names: For deep dish, Pequod’s is where true Chicagoan’s enjoy pizza and beer. As for thinner crust, Neapolitan-style pizza, Coalfire. You’re welcome. 

Chicago has something special for every palate, craving, and budget. Coming from my experience as a frequent traveler, the best part of traveling is enjoying the culinary delights every city has to offer. Would anyone pass on a salmon dinner in Alaska, sushi in San Francisco, steak in Texas, or barbeque in Kansas City? You get my point. Take the time to venture out during this Chicago meeting, by bus, train, or taxi, to satisfy your hunger and enjoy local delights.

By Amanda Bye, CRA


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NEW Course Spotlight: Dietary Supplements and the Eye

Posted By Elaine Lok, Thursday, September 25, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, September 2, 2014

NEW Course Spotlight: Dietary Supplements and the Eye

Date:  Friday, October 17, 2014 @ 2:30PM

Speaker:  Steven Schwartz, MD

The actions of dietary supplements are diverse and may even be adverse. Their prevalence and their potential toxicity are underappreciated among ophthalmologists and allied personnel. With a high index of suspicion, both vision-threatening and potentially life-threatening interactions may be avoided.

Upon completion of the course, the attendee will be better able to recognize and discuss the risks and benefits of supplement use in the context of an ophthalmology practice.


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NEW Course Spotlight: Double-Header: Game 1: How Ultra-Wide Angle Imaging is Changing the Way We Treat Patients, Game 2: Multimodal Retinal Imaging in the Era of Gene Therapy

Posted By Elaine Lok, Wednesday, September 24, 2014
Updated: Tuesday, September 2, 2014

NEW Course Spotlight:  Double-Header: Game 1: How Ultra-Wide Angle Imaging is Changing the Way We Treat Patients,  Game 2: Multimodal Retinal Imaging in the Era of  Gene Therapy

Date:  Monday, October 20, 2014 @ 4PM 

Speaker:  Szilard Kiss, MD

Game 1: The first half-hour of the presentation will reveal how the use of ultra-wide angle retinal imaging is changing the way retina specialists are evaluating and treating patients.

Until recently, photographic documentation of the retinal periphery could only be accomplished by taking many individual images, which was time-consuming and often difficult on the patients and arduous for the ophthalmic photographer. At the end of this course, the student should be able to list several advantages that ultra-wide angle imaging provides in the evaluation of retinal disease and discuss the impact ultrawide angle imaging has had on treatment paradigms.

Game 2: In the second half hour, multimodal retinal imaging in the era of ocular gene therapy will be discussed. With on-going advances in ocular imaging, the eye can be better observed and monitored than ever before. The use of new OCT modalities are contributing towards unraveling the genetic basis of retinal degenerations such as age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt's disease, and a host of other disorders. The use of OCT, FAF, fluorescein angiography and other imaging modalities are contributing to the overall understanding of diseases that may benefit from gene therapy.

At the end of this course, the attendees will possess a basic understanding of what ocular gene therapy is and how a variety of both traditional and new

imaging modalities are playing an important role in its future.


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