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Welcome to the Ophthalmic Photographers' Society Blog! The posts on this blog are authored by a myriad of individuals in Ophthalmology. Posts are not always authored by those directly affiliated with the Ophthalmic Photographers' Society and opinions may not be those of the OPS; however, all posts are submitted to a review process and have been approved by the OPS before being posted. Comments are open to the public. New posts are added every Friday, so make sure to check back often!

 

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Wow, what a difference!

Posted By Houston P. Sharpe III, Friday, August 28, 2015
Updated: Friday, August 28, 2015

I have always enjoyed attending OPS meetings and webinars.  During my first OPS meeting I knew almost no one. Each year since, I have met many new people who are interested in or already immersed in ophthalmic photography.  I am always excited to return home and apply these new tips and tricks during our clinic and observe the resulting differences.   Seeing the change in quality, that resulted from implementing the knowledge gained from the OPS continuing education programs, has impressed upon me the fact that we have a responsibility to continue our education in order to improve our skills.

Recently, I had a difficult view during a FA on a traditional fundus camera due to a severe cataract in the transit eye.  After finishing the mid-phase photographs I felt less than thrilled with my performance.  I thought about a trick that I remember hearing during a lecture at an OPS meeting, "If you have a difficult view through a cataract for a FA, use the Heidelberg”.  Wow, what a difference!  That severe cataract was causing very little distortion to the averaged image I was able to quickly obtain.  After showing my fellow photographers and the attending, I told them the trouble that I had and how I circumvented it.  I felt even more joy from passing on the technique to those around me, hoping that one day it will make a difference in someone else’s treatment. 

I hope to see y’all in Las Vegas for this year’s annual meeting where we can all learn from each other!

 Houston P. Sharpe, III, COA, OCT-C (top); Debra Cantrell, COA (bottom).

Tags:  2015  AAO  blog  cute  education  Educational Meeting  Fluorescein Sodium Dye  Ice Breakers  Meaningful Use  research  Special Events  Tips  Travel  Tricks 

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My Experience Attending the Ophthalmic Imaging Crash Course, OPS New Orleans 2013

Posted By Melissa Ward, Friday, December 6, 2013
Updated: Friday, December 6, 2013

Two days before heading to New Orleans to attend JCAPHO, my office manager asked if I had signed up for any imaging classes. When I signed up for this conference about 3 months before, I had not really been doing much imaging in the retina clinic where I work, just OCTs here and there. About 2 months after registering for my classes, another tech and I were chosen to start learning how to do fluorescein angiography. I was really excited because I knew that this would open so many doors. I am involved in a few clinical trials at our clinic, doing the lab draws and other tasks. I love this part of my job and I know that a lot of our retina studies involve fluorescein angiography as part of screening subjects, monitoring them throughout the study. I knew that mastering fluorescein angiography would make me a better tech in the clinic as well as being able to use those skills in clinical research.

Friday morning, I found the hotel where the OPS conference was being held and easily registered for this Ophthalmic Imaging Crash Course on site. I was very surprised and pleased to find that there were only about 15 people in this course.

 

Photo by Sarah Moyer

The way that this all-day crash course was set up was extremely educational. There were 30 minute lectures with 1 hour workshops to follow each lecture. The workshops were absolutely my favorite part as I am a hands-on learner. I was lucky enough to have a great teacher to assist with the hands-on training. Tony Medina was very knowledgeable and made the learning atmosphere very comfortable and inviting. I came out of this crash course feeling confident that I could go back to my clinic in Silverdale Washington and practice the skills that I learned. I could also share my new knowledge with my fellow tech in training.

 

 Photo by Sarah Moyer

During the OCT workshop, Tony taught us the basics of OCT imaging and showed us a few tricks for hard-to-capture patients. During the Fundus Photography and Fluorescein Angiography workshops, we were shown the basics on the same instrument we have in our clinic.

 

Photo by Sarah Moyer

When I came back to work, I shared my experience with our new lead technician and he is now very excited to teach us to be great photographers. My fellow tech and I are practicing as much as we can, watching the veteran photographers, and familiarizing ourselves with the equipment often. Now two weeks out from attending this course, I have been taking a lot of fundus photos and have done three assisted angiograms, utilizing both machines I used during the Crash Course.

Sarah Moyer had asked me if I would change anything about this crash course. Honestly, this course is designed to be helpful for someone like me who is just being introduced to ophthalmic imaging as well as someone who hasn’t even touched a camera in the clinic. Therefore the outline of this course is great! Maybe students can be organized in groups by skill, which would make the workshop time for productive and useful. First time users have different questions than intermediate techs. On the other hand, perhaps at the end of the program the teachers could stick around to answer those personalized questions.

Overall I am grateful to be one of the first to experience this new course and I am excited to share my experience with other prospective ophthalmic photographers. All of the speakers and teachers were wonderful and very insightful. Thanks to the speakers and workshop instructors: Kirsten Locke, Melanie Zuckero, Laura Savage, James Soque, Michael Kelly, Sarah Moyer, Tony Medina, Jaclyn Pisano, and Beth Koch!

 

 

Photo by Jaclyn Pisano

 

Melissa Ward, Certified Medical Assistant/Ophthalmic Technician, Silverdale, WA  

Tags:  AAO  blog  cute  education  Educational Meeting  Fluorescein Sodium Dye  Ice Breakers  Interactive  Meaningful Use  New Orleans  New Orleans Interactive  Study  Travel 

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Looking for a Barrier Filter to Cover the Sun

Posted By Alan Frohlichstein, Friday, August 23, 2013
Updated: Friday, August 23, 2013

Each St. Patrick’s Day in Chicago, we have the dying of the Chicago River. A short section of the river, between Wabash and the lock to Lake Michigan, has Fluorescein Sodium dumped in from a motorboat, which then proceeds to stir it up, giving the river an intense green color. I have made several attempts over the years to image this process as an angiogram, with an exciter and barrier filter, but, so far, I have been only marginally successful. The Barrier filter works well, but I haven’t found an exciter filter to fit over the sun, or at least a half mile by three quarter mile area over the river. I have made a few attempts at night, but between the ambient light, and the diffusion of the fluorescein in the intervening hours, nothing really imaged.


The images in this group are from 2012.

 

Pre Injection

Pre Injection

 

Arterial Filling

Arterial Filling

 

Venous Phase

Venous Phase

 

Recirculation

Recirculatin

 

More Recirculation

More Recirculation

 

Late Phase

Late Phase

 

With Barrier Filter

With Barrier Filter

 

Without Barrier Filter

Without Barrier Filter

 

The Wrigley Building

The Wrigley Building

 

If you know where I can get the super size exciter filter, please let me know.

 

Alan Frohlichstein, BFA, BS, CRA, FOPS

Tags:  blog  Chicago  Chicago River  cute  Fluorescein Sodium Dye  funny  Ice Breakers  Interactive  Meaningful Use  PDC  Tips  Travel 

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