Print Page   |   Sign In   |   Join OPS
Search



 

 

  

  

  

OPS Blog
Blog Home All Blogs
Welcome to the Ophthalmic Photographers' Society Blog! The posts on this blog are authored by a myriad of individuals in Ophthalmology. Posts are not always authored by those directly affiliated with the Ophthalmic Photographers' Society and opinions may not be those of the OPS; however, all posts are submitted to a review process and have been approved by the OPS before being posted. Comments are open to the public. New posts are added every Friday, so make sure to check back often!

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: blog  PDC  education  Educational Meeting  Travel  Ice Breakers  Meaningful Use  Interactive  cute  Mid-year  Professional Development Committee  funny  Special Events  New Life  Study  AAO  Tips  school  Chicago  2015  Ann Arbor  Professionalism  Social Media  2016  ICOP  Kellogg Eye Center  Facebook  Fort Worth  JJJ Award  Keynote Speaker 

Ophthalmic Jeopardy!

Posted By Tim Bennett, Monday, April 3, 2017
Updated: Friday, May 12, 2017

In what’s become a bit of a tradition at OPS Mid-Year Educational Programs, I been invited to present Ophthalmic Jeopardy again in 2017. The mid-year is a great environment for this presentation, as the attendees are all together in the same lecture hall for the entire program. In short, I have a captive audience!

If you’ve never seen it, Jeopardy is an irreverent but truly educational event, loaded with audio clips, videos, and spectacular clinical images. Although it’s been presented several times at OPS meetings, it’s just a little different each time. I try to customize the content for each specific meeting and location, often pulling inspiration from topics that will be covered by other presenters earlier in the educational program. At every OPS lecture I attend, I often take notes looking for new categories and questions. I also get some great material from other OPS members who forward ideas and images to me after seeing Jeopardy in action.

Looking over the great lineup of speakers and topics scheduled for Pittsburgh, I’ve been able to choose some cool categories and begin writing questions. New or recent categories will include: Creepy Crawlies, Oma Gosh, and The ‘Burgh. Of course I’ll include some of the classics such as: Animal Kingdom, Celestial Bodies, Ex Girlfriends, Video Acuity, and OCT Rorschach Test.

Hopefully I’ll see you in Pittsburgh. I’ll be channeling my inner Alex Trebek as host of Ophthalmic Jeopardy - although it’s probably closer to the Will Ferrell’s SNL impersonation of Trebek! Ophthalmic Jeopardy is a fun, informative, and challenging way to learn. If you do attend the meeting, be sure to pay attention to all the great speakers/lectures in the Mid-Year program lineup. I’ve been known to sneak in questions at the last minute and see if everyone has been paying attention!

For more on the origins and evolution of Ophthalmic Jeopardy, check out my personal blog at: http://eye-pix.com/what-is-edutainment/

Tags:  2017  blog  cute  education  Educational Meeting  Ice Breakers  Interactive  Jeopardy  Meaningful Use  Mid-year  Pittsburgh  Special Events  Travel 

Share |
PermalinkComments (1)
 

Discovering the OPS

Posted By John Hensel, Monday, December 12, 2016
Updated: Wednesday, December 21, 2016

There have always been two sides to me, the artistic and the scientific. As a professional photographer and artist based in Boston, I have passionately pursued my artistic side. Yet I've always found myself spending much of my leisure time reading about science, and imagining what it would be like to make a contribution in that field. So I was delighted to come across the field of Ophthalmic Photography. It offered the opportunity to apply my photographic knowledge to the pursuit of medical advances and to do something good in the world. I was so intrigued that I took the plunge, signing up for the OPS Annual Program to learn all about the field and see whether it could be a good fit for my passions (to make a long story short it was all that I hoped it would be!)

In prepping for the conference, I found the OPS Lending Library as well as the OPS Website to be wonderful resources that allowed me to learn the basics of eye anatomy and ophthalmic photography as I eagerly anticipated getting to the conference to learn more. Sarah Moyer Armstrong was extremely helpful, thorough and informative in her responses to my inquiries on course selection. With Sarah's advice I took the Crash Course, as well as intro courses and workshops on Fundus Photography, Fluorescein Angiography and OCT-A as well as the stunning course "Best of the Best". Upon meeting Sarah at the conference, her warmth, encouragement, and introductions were invaluable. I cannot thank her enough.

 

Myself with Sarah Moyer Armstrong, CRA, OCT-C, FOPS at the OPS Business Meeting (Photo by Alan Frohlichstein, CRA, FOPS )

 

Crash Course Class of 2016. It was a lot of fun! (Photo by Alan Frohlichstein, CRA, FOPS)

 

As a "newbie" I was amazed at the generous amount of hands-on and small group training, not to mention the one-on-one interactions I was able to have with experts in the field; a special thank you to Bob CavicchiSarah Moyer ArmstrongHouston Sharpe IIIHoang NguyenJim Soque and many others.

I also especially appreciated the combination of lecture courses with associated workshops as it satisfied my curiosity on the science/context/history and how it related to the "how to".

 

 Great Hands-on Training with Instructor Adeline M Stone, COT, CRA, CDOS (Photo by Alan Frohlichstein, CRA, FOPS)

 

There were also the fascinating special events such as the Scientific Paper Session and the reception where I was warmly welcomed by my instructors, fellow students, and committee members. I felt excited by the potential to join this community of highly engaged photographers.

And for a fun break and mixer, there was the photo scavenger hunt! Here is my team, literally embodying the OPS!

 

My Scavenger Hunt Team.  (Photo by Chuck Hamm, CRA, OCT-C)

 

Lastly, one particular highlight I will always remember… the incoming President Michael Kelly took the time to give a lecture in the Crash Course. He spoke of the fascinating detective work that goes into imaging difficult cases. I was intrigued by the iterative methodology of combining techniques and subtly altering standard methodologies to get to the bottom of unusual cases. He was speaking my language, and of my dreams to use my photographic knowledge to make a contribution to medicine/science and to helping patients.

 

Thank you Michael Kelly, FOPS (Photo by Alan Frohlichstein, CRA, FOPS)

 

I take my hat off to the incredible all-volunteer effort that produced a conference that was well organized, educational, welcoming, and inspiring. Thank you!

I also have some exciting news since returning home from the conference. I will be beginning my first Ophthalmic Photographer position at Massachusetts Eye and Ear in January, 2017! I can’t wait!

 

Bio: John Hensel has a BA in visual arts from Oberlin College. Currently he is a professional photographer, business owner, and artist living in Boston, MA. He is very excited to begin a career in ophthalmic photography!

Tags:  2016  AAO  blog  Chicago  education  Educational Meeting  Ice Breakers  Professionalism  Special Events  Study  Travel 

Share |
PermalinkComments (3)
 

Wow, what a difference!

Posted By Houston P. Sharpe III, Friday, August 28, 2015
Updated: Friday, August 28, 2015

I have always enjoyed attending OPS meetings and webinars.  During my first OPS meeting I knew almost no one. Each year since, I have met many new people who are interested in or already immersed in ophthalmic photography.  I am always excited to return home and apply these new tips and tricks during our clinic and observe the resulting differences.   Seeing the change in quality, that resulted from implementing the knowledge gained from the OPS continuing education programs, has impressed upon me the fact that we have a responsibility to continue our education in order to improve our skills.

Recently, I had a difficult view during a FA on a traditional fundus camera due to a severe cataract in the transit eye.  After finishing the mid-phase photographs I felt less than thrilled with my performance.  I thought about a trick that I remember hearing during a lecture at an OPS meeting, "If you have a difficult view through a cataract for a FA, use the Heidelberg”.  Wow, what a difference!  That severe cataract was causing very little distortion to the averaged image I was able to quickly obtain.  After showing my fellow photographers and the attending, I told them the trouble that I had and how I circumvented it.  I felt even more joy from passing on the technique to those around me, hoping that one day it will make a difference in someone else’s treatment. 

I hope to see y’all in Las Vegas for this year’s annual meeting where we can all learn from each other!

 Houston P. Sharpe, III, COA, OCT-C (top); Debra Cantrell, COA (bottom).

Tags:  2015  AAO  blog  cute  education  Educational Meeting  Fluorescein Sodium Dye  Ice Breakers  Meaningful Use  research  Special Events  Tips  Travel  Tricks 

Share |
PermalinkComments (4)
 

Me, Myself, and Eye

Posted By Timothy Bennett, Friday, July 24, 2015
Updated: Friday, July 24, 2015

 

As a life-long photographer, I’ve taken my share of selfies over the years. I’ve even attempted a few with the equipment I use for diagnostic ophthalmic photography. Part 1 of this blog explored the fun side of taking selfies with ophthalmic instruments.This post explores the more serious side of eye selfies. 

Surprisingly, the ability to take eye "selfies” has helped me identify and track pathology in my own eyes. Two years ago I suffered an idiopathic retinal tear with avulsed bridging vessel and persistent vitreous hemorrhage. This was successfully treated with vitrectomy. Like many patients, I developed a cataract after the vitrectomy. I also began to notice some distortion that corresponded to progression of an epiretinal membrane (ERM) in the same eye.

Any time I noticed a change in vision I would repeat an OCT on myself. Over the course of six months I tracked an increase in thickness of about 100 microns. The cataract also progressed and I was scheduled for cataract surgery. Two weeks prior to surgery I noticed a very subtle change in vision and sat down at the OCT like I’d done several times in the past. The OCT detected some cystoid macular edema (CME) from the ERM. Picking up the CME prior to cataract surgery was very beneficial. Preexisting CME can be exacerbated by cataract surgery, so my surgeon began a course of treatment that reduced the edema. My OCT selfies likely helped us avoid more severe or persistent edema by catching it in advance.

Cataract surgery went as planned, but within a few hours of my procedure I began to notice a new visual abnormality: a paracentral gray scotoma. Upon arriving at the clinic the next day for my post-operative check, I immediately did an SLO/OCT selfie and identified an unusual finding that corresponded directly to the scotoma.

SD-OCT demonstrated an area of hyper-reflectivity in the middle retinal layers just temporal to the fovea (green arrows) and the IR reflectance image showed a distinct dark gray lesion. Fortunately, the scotoma began to fade within a few days and so did the lesion. The jury is still out on the exact cause of the lesion but the selfies have enabled us to track improvement of my condition and possibly publish a case report. We believe it may be a case of paracentral acute middle maculopathy (PAMM), a recently described variant of acute macular neuroretinopathy (AMN). It's rare enough, that I was able to present it at the OPS Rare Case Symposium in Ann Arbor.

As you can see, image quality can be quite good with a little practice. So good in fact that I’ve received a bill from my institution for OCT images that I’ve performed on myself! Here is a double selfie video of a Spectralis IR fundus image showing how easy it is to capture my own epiretinal membrane.

"

There is a belief that taking selfies can be a sign of narcissism rather than simple self-expression. There is also some concern it can be addicting and unhealthy. Maybe this is true and I should stop taking selfies of my own eyes. After all I keep finding abnormalities! But there is a growing trend in telemedicine where patients can take and forward selfies to their doctors to help diagnose or triage the urgency of their condition. 

Ophthalmic Photographers taking diagnostic selfies: obsessive, silly, or beneficial?

Tags:  2015  Ann Arbor  blog  education  Educational Meeting  Ice Breakers  Interactive  Kellogg Eye Center  Meaningful Use  Mid-year  PDC  Selfies  Tips 

Share |
PermalinkComments (7)
 

Evening Entertainment Establishments

Posted By Donald Kuitula, Friday, June 12, 2015
Updated: Monday, June 15, 2015

Like any good college town, Ann Arbor has a large variety of drinking establishments featuring great drink specials along with lively atmospheres. Those seeking a game of pool, a place to dance or even drink beer from "Das Boot” will find it here. The following is a small list of bars showing the diversity of hangouts in the area:

 

http://www.tourtheten.com

The Brown Jug is a U of M landmark which opened its doors back in 1936. The bar is named after the jug that is passed to the winner of the Michigan/Minnesota football game each year. Dating back to 1903, the brown jug is the oldest rivalry trophy in college football. The Brown Jug has been recognized as one of the best campus bars in the U.S. and offers an expansive food menu and equally impressive drink menu with lots of daily specials. This is a place where their motto holds true: "good food, good drinks and good friends”. If you like outdoor dining and house made sangria, look no further than Dominick's in the south university area. They are known for their seafood, Italian fare and pizza. In addition to their top selling sangria, a pink slushy drink called Constant Buzz is also a favorite of Dominick's regulars. It's best to arrive before seven as the place fills up quickly each night.

 

 

http://www.concentratemedia.com 

Ashley's near the heart of campus on South State Street has been rated as one of the top 100 beer bars in the country. They offer over 50 taps with a mix of local favorites as well as beers from around the world. The dining menu at Ashley's has pub bites as well as burgers, wraps, sandwiches and a large selection of specialty fries. When you are in the mood to lay it all out on the dance floor, Necto has been recently voted as the best nightclub in Michigan. "Transport” Thursday offers Ann Arbor's biggest college party as DJ Knowledge brings high energy with Top 40, House, Throwback and Pop. "Frequency” Saturday Night is reserved for Top 40, Dance and House music with DJ Hardy and host MC Yoda. Their extended weekend happy hour goes from 9-11 Thursday through Sunday to help you bust out your best moves.

 

 http://www.theuntz.com

 

If your goal is to shoot pool, throw darts and have some PBR and popcorn, check out the 8 Ball Saloon. This seedy dive bar is located in the basement of the famous Blind Pig music venue which has hosted everyone from Jimmy Hendrix to the MC5 to Nirvana. It features a great jukebox, cash only bar with cheap drinks and an utter lack of pretension. When there is a big game on that you simply cannot miss, Scorekeepers is the place to be with many large projection screens to appease the most diehard sports fan. Known as a college bar that caters to the younger crowd, this bar also turns into a dance club after 11 pm. This is a great place for big groups and anyone looking to catch their favorite team in action.

 

 

 http://www.thinkgeek.net

The Rathskeller is located beneath the Heidelberg restaurant. The alpine dining room upstairs serves a variety of traditional German food from marinated Herring and Spaetzle to Schnitzel, Sauerbraten and Knockwurst. Head downstairs to the Rathskeller to enjoy over 14 taps specializing in the many different styles of German beer. If you've ever wanted to drink out of a bierstiefel (glass boot), this is the place! The boots are offered in 1 or 2 liter sizes and you can even purchase one to take home with you. Bill's Beer Garden is a place like no other. It takes over the parking lot of Downtown Home and Garden when the century old retailer closes its doors at 6:30. There is ample outdoor seating along with a large selection of beer and wine. Food can be brought in from the adjacent Mark's Carts food cart courtyard. The courtyard has eight food carts ready to serve Mexican, Indian and Chinese among other types of food. It's a true collaboration of three different businesses coming together to offer a unique outdoor experience.

 

When the night time is the right time, there is a bar for any mood or occasion. These are just a few of the many places around town to help you unwind after the conference. I encourage you to head out and explore the nightlife in Ann Arbor!


Tags:  2015  Ann Arbor  Beer  blog  cute  education  Educational Meeting  funny  Ice Breakers  Interactive  Kellogg Eye Center  Mid-year  PDC  Special Events  Study  Tips  Travel 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 1 of 11
1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  >   >>   >| 
Sign In


Latest News
Calendar

10/11/2019 » 10/14/2019
2019 OPS 50th Annual Education Program-San Francisco

 

 

COPYRIGHT © 2011-2019 THE AUTHOR(S) AND THE OPHTHALMIC PHOTOGRAPHERS' SOCIETY INC.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.