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OPS-ATPO Virtual Symposium
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OPS-ATPO Virtual Symposium

OPS and the Association of Technical Personnel in Ophthalmology (ATPO) are excited to announce the OPS-ATPO Virtual Symposium available online August 17-31, 2020!  OPS and ATPO have joined forces to develop an on-demand program that will feature educational opportunities for both technicians and photographers! 

REGISTRATION

All lectures will be provided as on-demand webinars to be viewed during the two week period of August 17-31, 2020.   Attendees have the option to choose lecture packages ranging between 3-6 lectures.  Continuing Education Credits will be awarded by the OPS and CME credits will be awarded by Amedco.  Registration will be available soon.  

PACKAGE MEMBER PRICE* NON-MEMBER PRICE
3 lectures $75 $90
4 lectures $95 $110
5 lectures $115 $130
6 lectures $135 $150
*Member pricing is available for OPS and ATPO members.

 

LECTURES

2020 Symposium 001 - Won't Get Fooled Again: Surviving the World of OCT Artifacts
Speaker:  Gary Miller, CRA, OCT-C, FOPS

COURSE SUMMARY:   This course will cover Optical Coherence Tomography techniques with an emphasis on how to achieve consistent high-quality diagnostic scans. Identification of scanning artifacts, analysis artifacts, and common and unusual pathologic features will be presented. Discussion will include tips and techniques to reduce or eliminate OCT artifacts, improve scan signal strength, and maximize diagnostic information.  

SESSION OUTCOMES:
     
At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify normal retinal landmarks and common pathologic features
  • List techniques for improving signal strength
  • Recognize common scanning and analysis artifacts
  • Describe techniques used to reduce or eliminate OCT artifacts

CEC:   OPS 1; CME 1- PENDING APPROVAL 

 

2020 Symposium 002 - Descriptive Interpretation of Fluorescein Angiography - the Basics
Speaker:  Paula F. Morris, BS, CRA, FOPS

COURSE SUMMARY:

This is a course for basic to intermediate imagers that introduces the terminology used to describe circulatory patterns in the eye as shown by fluorescein angiography.  Fluorescein angiography is the cornerstone of ophthalmic photography and is still an essential diagnostic tool in the identification and treatment of many ocular disorders.  Knowledge of the circulation patterns in retinal and choroidal disease is critical to producing high quality studies, which will assist the physician in selecting treatment.  Interpretation of angiographic studies using descriptive terms is a fundamental skill for imagers which increases understanding of normal and abnormal patterns and the circulation dynamics causing them. 

SESSION OUTCOMES:
     
At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • describe the appearance of hyper-fluorescence and the circulation dynamic causing it using descriptive terms
  • describe the appearance of hypo-fluorescence and the circulation dynamic causing it using descriptive terms
  • explain the application and relevance of the phrase, "relative to the adjacent tissues", when describing a circulation pattern in an angiogram

CEC:  OPS 1; CME 1- PENDING APPROVAL

 

2020 Symposium 003 - Imaging During a Pandemic - Panel Discussion
Speakers:  Sarah Armstrong, CRA, OCT-C, FOPS; Timothy Bennett, CRA, OCT-C, FOPS; Kenneth M Boyd, CRA; Teesha McClam, OCT-C; Tamera Schoenholz, CRA, OCT-C; Benjamin Ysasaga, CRA, CDOS, OCT-C, COA

COURSE SUMMARY:   This panel will review how ophthalmic imaging has changed due to COVID-19.  Safety topics will be reviewed such as patient and employee wellness screenings, PPE, and equipment cleaning.  There will be a discussion about workflow, patient volumes, equipment modifications, and modified imaging protocols. 

SESSION OUTCOMES:
     
At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • List how clinics are managing wellness screening and PPE for both patient and employees.
  • Describe techniques to modify equipment and imaging protocols to increase safety for patients and photographers.
  • Discuss how workflow and patient volumes have been impacted by COVID.

CEC:  OPS 1; CME 1- PENDING APPROVAL

Take the Imaging During a Pandemic survey HERE.  

 

2020 Symposium 004 – You’ve Got a Lot of Nerve!  

Speakers:  Amy Jost, BS, COMT, CCRC, CTC

COURSE SUMMARY:   This presentation is intended to enhance technician training and speaks directly to the work-up tests that technicians perform on a daily basis.  All technicians perform history taking, pupillary assessments, confrontation visual fields, and ocular motility exams. These skills are enhanced by a better understanding of the related ocular anatomy and function of the visual system. The instructor will review various ophthalmic skills and concepts that will enhance the technician’s work up and better prepare the patient for the doctor.

  

SESSION OUTCOMES:
     
At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify when the technician should perform additional ocular testing to address sudden onset of loss of functionality of the ocular muscles, pupils, and lids.
  • Differentiate between afferent messages (messages from the eye to the brain) and efferent messages (messages from the brain to the eye).
  • Demonstrate proper techniques for EOM Testing, Pupillary Assessments, Ptosis Measurements, and Confrontation Visual Field Testing.

CEC:  OPS 1; CME 1- PENDING APPROVAL

 

 

2020 Symposium 005 – Road Map to Imaging for the Retina Patient

Speakers:  David Jacobs, MD; Lea Anderlini, COT, OCS; Lynn Roderick, CRA, OCT-C; Mark Zalewski, BS, CRA, OCT-C

 

COURSE SUMMARY:   This course is intended to enhance the understanding of both the ophthalmic technicians and the ophthalmic imagers that work everyday hand-in-glove with the ophthalmologist.  The many and varied retinal diseases require special and varied testing on both the technician’s and imager’s part.  To better understand “when and why” to take a different approach requires the direction of the ophthalmologist.  A brief overview of the history and application of ophthalmic imaging will be reviewed.  This will be followed by a retinal ophthalmologist’s “road map” of required testing for the ophthalmic retinal technician work-up and ophthalmic retinal imager.

SESSION OUTCOMES:
     
At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Understand a brief history and application of ophthalmic imaging for both the ophthalmic technician and ophthalmic imager.
  • Identify various retinal disorders and the testing required of both the ophthalmic workup technician and ophthalmic imager.
  • Better understand “when and why” you need to stop, review, and consult with the ophthalmologist before considering your testing complete.
  • Enhance the efficiency, accuracy, and thoroughness of the testing by the ophthalmic retinal technician and ophthalmic retinal imager.

CEC:  OPS 1; CME 1- PENDING APPROVAL

 

2020 Symposium 006 – Road Map to Imaging for the Cataract Patient

Speakers:  Ankur Gupta, MD, MBA; Stephen Hamilton, COA; Kristin McCurley, BS, CRA; Mark Bartlett, CRA

 

COURSE SUMMARY:   This course is intended to enhance the understanding of both the ophthalmic technicians and the ophthalmic imagers that work every day with the ophthalmologist to provide world-class eye care.  There have been many improvements in both cataract surgery and intraocular lens implants in the recent past.  This has brought with it greater patient expectations.  Patient pathology, desired outcome, and expectations factor into the orders for the various tests the ophthalmologist will ask for.  To better understand “when and why” to take a different approach requires the direction of the ophthalmologist.  A Cataract and Refractive Surgeon will review our “road map” of required testing of the patient needing cataract surgery.  This will help both the ophthalmic technician and ophthalmic imager to better prepare the patient for the ophthalmologist.

SESSION OUTCOMES:
     
At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Better identify the variables that can influence the testing required of both the ophthalmic workup technician and ophthalmic imager.
  • Better understand “when and why” you need to stop, review, and consult with the ophthalmologist before considering your testing complete.
  • Enhance the efficiency, accuracy, and thoroughness of the testing by the ophthalmic technician and ophthalmic imager.

CEC:  OPS 1; CME 1- PENDING APPROVAL


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8/12/2020
Webinar Wednesday

8/17/2020 » 8/31/2020
OPS-ATPO Virtual Symposium

 

 

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